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Category Archives: Project Files

New Resources Category

In an effort to enhance the usefulness of The Louverture Project, I’m going to start adding web links and other resources to the site. I’ll probably experiment a bit before I find the right way to present everything, but my first idea is to create a new category of posts called “Resources.” Under this, I’ll […]

My Philosophy

God bless my fianc�e Louise. I�m going to start running these essays by her before I post them. (She�s a trained editor, don�t you know!) She pointed out some serious weaknesses in Saturday�s entry, including unsubstantiated claims and sweeping generalizations. Most of all she wants me to support the assertions that I make. (Imagine!) Louise, […]

Squeezing French from a Stone

I�d like to get to the point where I�m posting here at least once a day. It might not always be interesting, but here goes… As a lot of the original materials having to do with the Haitian Revolution are in French, I�ve been studying the language through Rosetta Stone. I paid for a quarterly […]

Silencing the Past

From Silencing the Past – Power and the Production of History, by Michel-Rolph Trouillot, p 25: “For what history is changes with time and place or, better said, history reveals itself only through the production of specific narratives. What matters most are the process and conditions of production of such narratives. Only a focus on […]

After the flood…

Just finished reading all 250 posts to the Haiti newsgroup since I joined at the beginning of the year. Whew! My brain is on overload right now and I’m still sifting through my thoughts, but here are a few observations: 1. It is striking how different reports of the same event can vary so widely. […]

Combien c’est Louisiana?

I’m reading from Henry Adams’ “The history of the United States of America during the Administrations of Jefferson and Madison.” Zounds! In this he declares that the Spaniard Godoy, by refusing to relinquish the Louisiana Territory upon discovering he had been duped, had as much influence as the revolt in Haiti on Napoleon’s decision to […]

A couple of things to kick off 2004

Happy New Year! I just came across this article on What You Can’t Say by way of Slashdot. I find myself wishing the author would find more evidence for his viewpoint, yet the topic of moral fashions is an intriguing one. Herman Hesse said, “We should remember that it is easy and foolish to sneer […]

The story is about land (?)

This is an intriguing idea – that the meta-meaning of the revolution was less about freedom than about land. According to Carolyn Fick, freedom to the slaves in Haiti was meaningless without land ownership. Ironic, then, that the Louisiana purchase opened up just that possibility for millions of American citizens. Read more of Corbett’s site […]

Toussint’s flaws; Napoleon’s designs

Toussaint made a fatal error in not confiding his plans in his generals. His weaknesses seem to include love of white culture and breeding, disdain for uneducated blacks, and isolation. Had he taken Moyse and Dessalines, for instance, into his confidence, had he educated them about the reasons behind his policies, they might have been […]

Surfing the waves of change.

Sometimes I can hardly believe that Toussaint accomplished what he did. His growth as a leader is nothing short of extraordinary. Once the Negroes had begun their revolt, once they had been armed and given hope, returning them to slavery would have been impossible. Toussaint must have seen that halting the revolution was impossible. He […]